Archive for the ‘food’ Category

sprouts!

May 23, 2010

My lovely friend, Annie recently wrote a post on sprouting and inspired me to grow my own. It is so easy! You can sprout just but anything; sunflower seeds, mung beans, lentils…you get the point. But why sprouts? They are the most enzyme rich food on the planet. With out enzymes, the aging of our body accelerates and our body begins to function less properly. Apparently, sprouts have up to 100 times more enzymes than a fruit or vegetable and are full of vitamins. Here are the steps I followed:

Choose your sprout. I decided to sprout mung beans.

Next, rinse.

Soak in water, 8-12 hours.

Using a cheese cloth and mason jar lid, I secured the mung beans. I tilted the jar upside down at an angle and kept it in a darkish corner in our pantry. Each night before I went to bed and each morning when I woke up, I rinsed the seeds. Because I had a mesh lid, I could fill and drain the jar with water. I repeated this exercise twice a day for 3 full days. Here they are! If you look at the above photo, you will see how just a small amount of seeds, filled my jar.

Nothing like waking up with some toast, almond butter, honey and fresh, home-grown sprouts! Enjoy!

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The best salmon recipe ever!!!

May 6, 2010

I hope I don’t get in trouble for sharing this one! I needed to take a quick trip back to the states (hence the 12 day absence from my blog) and wanted to make a special dinner for the man since he wouldn’t be joining me. So I thought I would make a good ol’ fashioned, California style dinner. We have a few specialty stores in Antigua (quite expensive though) and after digging through the freezer section, I found salmon and it actually looked decent. The sauce in the recipe is what makes it SO good. Think, Simon and Garfunkel. Gather a lot parsley, sage, rosemary and thyme. Chop it up and add loads of chopped garlic. What you see below is the amount I use for 2 people (I was not kidding when I said gather a lot!).

Next gather your sauces: balsamic, soy sauce, olive oil, sesame and worcestershire sauce. As usual, I don’t have exact measurements but I tend to use less soy sauce and worcestershire sauce.

OK! Mix the sauces and the chopped herbs together and just smell the aromas (take a bite if you like):

Pour this delicious mixture over your salmon and let it marinate for as long as you have the patience for (I have gone as short as 30 minutes and over night).

Now, we don’t have a bbq, but if you do, it’s so much better bbq’d in a foil boat. I only have an oven that goes no higher than 250F (what the heck is that about?) so I had a slow cooking session with my salmon. If you have normal oven, pre-heat to 350 and place fish inside for 8 minutes. Next, turn it up to a broil and let it give the top of that salmon a nice dose of heat for about 4 minutes (keep you eye on it). Pull it out and voila! A future post will include the pasta recipe you see photographed behind the salmon.

Nearly raw veggie wraps!

April 19, 2010

As I was thumbing through my favorite blogs today, I came across a fresh veggie wrap. I needed one. I mentally went through my inventory of all the ingredients in my fridge, pantry, nut section and garden, as I was not in the mood to make this complicated by going out to the store. So basically…it was delicious! The entire concept was built around two things: the need to make veggie wrap and papaya. For some reason, papaya became the main ingredient of the wrap. So I began with the sauce:

~smashed walnuts

~minced ginger

~orange rind and juice

~olive oil

~fennel

~honey

Mix it all together!

I had a pot of black beans already prepared and decided they should be in my wrap. Here is what the wrap consisted of:

~Chard for the wrap

~black beans

~papaya

~avocado

~cucumber

Wrap your wrap with fennel stems/leaves. Pour the sauce over it and Voila (r)!

Loquat Chutney!

April 16, 2010

I swear this will be more than just a food blog. This is just where I am at right now! As I was taking photos for my water post, I noticed about 10 ripe loquats on our tree. The only thing I could think was…chutney! I picked every single last one of those loquats (there were literally 10 on the entire tree) and peeped my kitchen for some ingredients. I ALWAYS have ginger, garlic and onions on standby for such emergencies (and this was no different). You will find that I don’t measure anything but I will give it a shot for blogging purposes. Keep in mind, this was using 10 loquats (good enough for one dinner serving).

-minced ginger (thumb size)

-grated my left over grapefruit peel (it calls for orange, but that’s all I had!) (teaspoon)

-brown sugar (a handful)

-10 halved loquats

-raisins from a granola mix (that’s your preference)

-white vinegar (1/3 cup)

-a pinch of cayenne pepper, cumin and cinnamon

I threw it all in a pot and let it simmer (covered) for 30 minutes. The end result was quite tasty! Again, I would have liked to have made at least a jars worth, but in the end, it was a nice addition to our dinner and it gave our tree a little more self worth.


Drink water!

April 15, 2010

We all know we need to drink it. But are we really drinking enough? I know I don’t. If you divide your weight in half (using pounds), that is precisely how many ounces of water your body needs in order to regulate its temperature, provide the means for nutrients to travel to your organs and to rid your body of the toxins we humans, take in every day. Twenty percent of your water will need to come from the food you eat and the rest via beverage.

I love water, but sometimes I just can’t swallow the idea of drinking tons of flavorless water. It really depends on my mood. Solution…add tasty fruits, herbs or even veggies! I like to add some sort of citrus fruit, mint leaves and slices of cucumber. Today I didn’t have any cucumber so I added a second citrus just for fun.  Get creative!

Today, I chopped up some lime, grape fruit and fresh mint leaves! I like to fill up a pitcher each day (and hopefully refill it through out the day) so that the tasty water is ready for me or any guests who happen to stop by. Enjoy!

Yucca Izote!

April 15, 2010

This is absolutely my new favorite thing to eat (this week)! While riding through the streets of San Miguel, Guatemala, we noticed this peculiar stem of flowers. I had never seen one before. Either way, I wanted one! Not only is it a beautiful blossom, stemming from a Yucca tree…it’s edible! Our gardener, Pedro, tells us that his wife uses them in tamales, while other people will dice them up and use it with eggs. Whilst tapping into my creative side, I remembered a recipe that I like to use with zucchini blossoms and decided to experiment with this new creature and hope for the best. The result…AMAZING! You can try this recipe with any blossom, but today…it’s with Izote blossoms!

First, wash your blossoms!

Stuff the blossoms with goat cheese, honey and rosemary…YUM!

Dip your filled blossom into a bowl of stirred eggs and place into an oiled pan. Flip a few times until it looks damn good!

Serve it with a sprinkle of fresh rosemary and a bit more honey on top.

Voila!

Nothing beats…homemade broth!

April 13, 2010
I have a feeling I may end up with entire category titled: Nothing beats…homemade _____! Drinking mineral-rich vegetable broth is one of the simplest and least expensive ways to improve your health. It is one of the best ways of bringing the pH into balance. Chicken and bone broth will be saved for a future post. This post will be about vegetable broth. It’s a nice way to get some needed vitamins and minerals in your system and many recipes will often call for a veggie broth. After I first made my own broth, I just could not find the heart to purchase broth in a box ever again, whether organic or not.
I have never made the same broth twice, but love ones I have made. For me, making my own broth became a bit of life savor because I always seem to buy more than I can swallow and often end up throwing away veggies. It’s painful! Here is what you do:
Take all of your washed, wilting and limp vegetables and cut them into large chunks.  This includes the skins and stems. (I have even added potato and carrot skins from another meal)
-Chop up some garlic, onions and even ginger if you like.
-Add dry or fresh herbs or both!
-Add some salt, pepper and a little oil (any kind, I prefer olive oil).
-Place all of this in a large pot, add enough water to cover and simmer for at least an hour and strain at the end.
Voila!
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